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HearthandHelm
HearthandHelm
Hearth & Helm. Reviving Folk Vitality in the Modern World. Video, Podcast and Blog with vital information on living holistically- from a traditional, conservative, feminine and primal perspective.
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Welcome

  • We three mothers collaborate to provide blog posts, videos, recipes, and podcasts. Topics include: homesteading, child rearing, spirituality, herbalism, nutrition, and more!

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HearthandHelm
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Tune in to DLive for our Folkish Economy Livestream! Join us as we interview multiple guests. Featuring several talented artisans, craftsmen and small business owners and their beautiful products. A wide variety of genres such as blacksmithing, fine art painting, drinking horn carving, leather work, soap making, hex signs, folk art, free press, quality clothing, and so much more...

Whether you're looking for some inspiration, a good conversation (join in the chat on DLive), or to support small businesses in your HOLIDAY SHOPPING- you'll find it this Sunday at 3 pm EST.

Don't have a DLIVE account? No problem, head on over and create one. It is free and easy. DLIVE is a free speech platform.

Click this link to Follow Hearth & Helm on DLive:

https://dlive.tv/Hearth_and_Helm


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HearthandHelm

Homeschool Progress, Seasons Changing, A Few Thoughts. . . I know many of our followers and frien...

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HearthandHelm

An Autumn Update

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HearthandHelm
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This is a funny story I wrote a few years ago about the time that we saved our house from burning by using Black Walnut dye. I gather the nuts with their "stinky" green hulls each year, stew them in a pot and then use the dye for my yarns. It creates a lasting stain or dye on the yarns in many rich shades of brown. The situation that the story references took place well over 10 years ago, and I can have a laugh now. Looking back, I am reminded of how wild we were back then...



Saved by Black Walnuts by Vasalisa

When we were searching for property back then we met with a realtor in our favorite county- one with thousands of acres of rolling wooded hills and quite a bit of fresh water.... At that point in time we had been together for just three years and had not yet had any children. 

We looked tirelessly for the right place, whether on our own or with the local realtor. Each one had issues such as being too expensive, or not secluded enough. Finally with a cringe she said, hesitating, "Well there is this one other property..." Our eyes widened. Seeing our excitement she quickly tried to bring us back to reality by saying, literally, "If it were mine I'd burn it to the ground. It has no running water and it has the worst driveway in the county. It's miles off the beaten path; I don't know if you really want to see it."


Her attempts to dissuade us were futile. Off we went to see this "wretched" place...

Finally after miles of winding gravel roads we saw it, there it was, a little red cottage sitting waaay up on top of a very steep hill, one of the highest points in the county. The abandoned old shack sat on a couple of acres surrounded by huge 100 year old oaks, sugar maples, black walnuts and other hardwoods... The driveway was nearly impassable with an AWD, and filled with ruts and trenches.. and geode crystals! It even had a metal roof! It was exactly what we were looking for.

The realtor most likely concealed a hearty laugh and then realized we were serious. It had been donated to a church and so they sold it for a nice low price to boot.

We had very few possessions at that time because we had been mostly traveling and living out of our camper-shell-topped pickup truck for a few years. We moved everything to our new place and began unpacking and "decorating" our first night there. It was so exciting- our first property! We had big dreams and visions for what we would do there. Being that we didn't have running water yet, we brought a five gallon jug of drinking water to last us a couple days- one of those bottle necked blue plastic jugs... It was Winter- a cold February...

The house came with a wood-stove so we built a fire in it to keep warm.

We drank a couple of beers and were listening to some music (we did have electricity) and stayed up late unpacking and celebrating.

Suddenly we saw flames shooting out from where the stove pipe meets the drop ceiling!

Ahhhh! FIRE!!!!

Panic. No telephone...(This was, believe it or not, prior to the era when EVERYONE had smart phones) No running water... We just bought this place, literally yesterday... It was midnight. It was dark. No insurance... No nearby neighbors... Remote... Sitting on top of a steep hill with a terrible driveway...

I quickly grabbed the five gallon water jug and began trying to hoist it into the air to toss what became a "sprinkle" of water out of the tiny bottle neck. The flames raged on the synthetic material of the ceiling and the fiberglass insulation.
Meanwhile husband was trying to toss and pat the fire with blankets but it kept growing in strength! Within seconds we realized we were helpless.

I decided to run down the hill, down the road to the nearest neighbor (whom I had not met yet). I happened to be wearing all black, and arrived, distraught and sweaty in the night at our new neighbors home. Ringing their doorbell. Finally the man answered and he clearly had a pistol in his hand- prepared for trouble. A black clad crazy woman- sweaty, in tears, breathless, banging on his door out in the middle of nowhere at midnight in the middle of winter?


As soon as he opened the door I spoke rapidly,

"Hello. I'm sorry to bother you at this time of night. My husband and I just purchased that little cottage on top of the hill down the road- we don't have a telephone yet and no water. The house caught on fire! Please call the fire department! Do you have a jug of water I can take back with me? Please! Sorry! Thank you!"

He did look at me for a minute, wondering if this was some funny business. But finally he believed me and sprung to action, his wife called the fire department and he went to fill jugs of water and load them into his truck. Meanwhile, I ran back (partially walking with a pain in my side) to our driveway and was trucking up it as fast as I could. What would I do? How was my husband fairing? Had the whole place burnt down by now?

When I got to the top of the driveway and finally reached the house it was still standing. My husband was on top of the roof holding what was left of the water jug and pouring it down the chimney- very wise! It showed signs of taming the flames but it ran out...

He looked around him , "Water! We need water!!!"


There it was... This natural-dyeing, yarn-spinning gal had packed and moved, along with the rest of our belongings, a five gallon bucket of Black Walnut dye... (doesn't everyone take their buckets of plant dyes with them wherever they go?)


He scrambled down the ladder and back up again with the full bucket. We heard the sound of our neighbors four-wheel-drive truck at the bottom of the hill. Husband opened the lid of the bucket, and poured the Black Walnut dye down the chimney....
 
...the sweetest sound I had ever heard- "Ssssssssssssssssssssssss" as one element defeated the other.


The Black Walnut dye extinguished the chimney fire.


It saved our cottage. It saved our life.

Our neighbor made it to the top and with cries of joy I told him all was well! Who would have thought that 5 little gallons of liquid, strategically used, could have stopped that fire! Husband continued pouring the water our neighbor brought down the chimney just to make extra sure it wasn't going to flame up again. And, about thirty minutes later the fire department arrived.

They walked up the driveway, and informed us that we were very lucky because not only would they have not been able to get their fire truck up to our house, but the hill was so tall that even their hoses wouldn't have reached. We lost a lot of wood 2 x 4's and insulation and synthetic drop ceiling material around where the chimney was, but other than that it could all be repaired by my husband.

Obviously we learned a lesson the hard way- don't burn a fire until you've cleaned your chimney!

The inside of a black walnut shell

So you might have heard that Black Walnut (Juglans Nigra) has a delicious edible nut after removing the green hulls and curing the nuts for a few weeks.

You might have heard that it is an excellent vermifuge, cleansing the body of parasites when a tincture is made from the green hulls steeping them in vodka for several weeks.

You might have heard that the wood is beautiful and great to carve and build with.

You might have heard that a wonderful anti-fungal salve can be made with the green hulls and leaves...

But I bet you didn't know before that you can use the dye to save your house from burning down!

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HearthandHelm
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An EASY DIY Mini Greenhouse for Season Extension

This is an updated re-blog from my old Steemit account, but I thought you all might be interested in this.
The challenge of getting an early start to the growing season and the excitement that comes with it will be understood by many here. As market gardeners there are certain crops we start in February. We are in USDA Agricultural zone 5/6, which means our lowest possible winter temperatures are -15. This is an unheated greenhouse, more properly termed high tunnel, that can be used in colder or warmer climates to extend the growing season at the beginning and the end of the grow season. Tight now in Autumn, the landscape around us is all turning brown and death has come to the greenery that once was. But inside the high tunnel, there are lush greens- kale, arugula, spinach, and more. Our high tunnel is not heated. Just having an extra "layer" of protection can extend the growing season quite a bit! We expect to continue harvesting greens out of it into January.


Here is one of the types of chicken tractors we have used in the past. This is a small version of our mini high tunnel. It stays nice and warm in the winter for our laying hens, especially when we add a thick layer of straw inside for insulation.

I highly recommend Eliot Coleman's books on season extension for more concise information for your exact climate.

Today I'm going to tell you about this little life saver, our unheated seed starting high tunnel that we use every year. This style can be very useful on the homestead. With clear plastic for plants, and with canvas or old billboard tarp for portable animal shelters, it can even be a quick, inexpensive shed!


This photo is one of our very fist greenhouses.This was taken in late February/early March in Indiana. Plenty of greens and salad mix.

We see the plastic used in this case as appropriate technology, and although it is still plastic, and not exactly highly aesthetic, it enables us to grow so much more food than we could without it. It is also a stepping stone for us until we have a permanent plexiglass or recycled glass window greenhouse.

We sometimes run a small space heater for extra cold nights for the flats of seedlings that are on tables and benches. We also have planted directly in the ground in February using this same tunnel. (Things like lettuce, spinach, carrots and beets do just fine and are ready for harvest in April!

The crops get a good start with the passive solar during the day, and can tolerate some cold temperatures at night. If it's going to get very cold in late winter when we have seedlings in there, we cover them with row cover , an agricultural fabric that can be purchased from Johnny's Seeds.

On sunny days it is important to vent the tunnel because it can get too hot.
The first step is to build the end walls using 8' 2x4's with a 12' long baseboard. We had a leftover greenhouse door he had built last year, so he built one of the end walls with a door frame to fit that door. One of the end walls will be your back wall and one of them will be the "front" of your greenhouse, and will need a door frame. You can use any old door you might have laying around, and build your door frame to fit it, or you can build that end wall with a custom door frame and then build the greenhouse door to fit it. (It is helpful to be able to fit a wheel barrow through!)


The end wall with door
Use these to assemble the pieces of the end walls, which are positioned on the inside of the structure:
Then connect the end walls at the base with 2x4's. You can either connect 2 - 8' 2x4's together for a 16' length on each side, or you could us 16' 2x4's or you could just make it 12' long using one 12' 2x4 on each side. In this case to save money we connected 2 8' 2x4's on each side for a length of 16'.
After you have assembled the base by connecting the 2x4 baseboards to the end walls, you then install a central beam on the top of the structure. We used these joist hangers:
Using 3/4" PVC pieces with a washer and a a lag bolt combo, place on the ends of the 2x4 base, on either side of the base of the end walls. Pre-drilling is optimal. These will serve as stabilizers for your end wall hoops.
Then place your 19.5' long 1" PVC hoop over the end wall and set it onto your stabilizers.
Then using pipe hangers, secure your first hoop (good job!) to the end wall in three places, including one over the center beam. Repeat this same process on the other end wall, so you now have two hoops!
The next step is to put the rest of your hoops on. Install 6 "stablizers", as described above, down each 2x4 baseboard at about 28" apart.
And then attach your six hoops!
Before putting the plastic on. Make some preparations. Using a circular saw and a saw guide strip 2- 8' 2x4s to make your own 1/2" trim for attaching your plastic. This will save you lots of money!

Finished "trim" will look like this.
Pre-drill and partially install your 1.5" screws about every 16" down each piece of trim.
Work smarter, not harder
Next it's time to put the plastic on! We purchased a piece of 20' x 25' 3mil plastic from the hardware store. You can also use 6mil. For more money and a better product, purchase greenhouse plastic. Once you have it draped over it's time to secure it with your trim boards. Please note: If you are like us and only purchased an exact size of plastic keep in mind there will not be an inch to spare! Starting along the base of the structure, begin stapling the plastic all along on one side of the tunnel. Then screw the trim boards over the edge of the plastic to secure it along the bottom of the greenhouse!

Repeat along the base of the other side of the tunnel, pulling the plastic taught as you staple, and then following with the trim boards. (Give thanks for your hard work of prepping those trim boards!) Then you will move to the end walls and continue the same process of pulling the plastic taught, stapling, and following with trim boards. You may find that on the end walls, depending on how you structured them, there may need to be some folding and even trimming of the plastic here.
Install your door, and if you like, add some felt around the frame to help it stay draft- free. You may also wish to go around the base of the tunnel with soil or mulch, or even an extra semi-buried piece of plastic, or a combination of these things, for more insulation.
Pour yourself a beverage, and go out to your new "fort" and sow some seeds!

This is an excellent form of season extension. Keep in mind, if you get cold weather in late winter and early spring you can use a space heater and agri-cloth to protect your seedlings.
This tunnel cost us just a little over $100 (in 2017), can't beat that!


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Our DLive stream from Sunday is now up on YouTube:

In this stream we discussed mental health, managing stress and anxiety with holistic methods, how an excess of stressors can lead to inflammation which lowers the immune system and can lead to getting sick. We also discuss the impacts that mask mandates and other draconian covid restrictions have on the psychological state of our folk and especially children. 

We discuss an interesting video interview with Dr. Mercola. Twitter censored the video and would not even allow Hearth & Helm to tweet it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zyksd_r0r_0
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https://dlive.tv/p/dlive-xplawjwssq+KrIwFatGg


Our latest stream is available on Live for the next three days. After that I might upload it to YouTube. Make sure to head over and follow us on DLive. Today's stream was about mental health, managing stress and anxiety in these spooky times using holistic methods. We also talked about growing micro greens, raising chickens and some tips and tricks we have gleaned over the years. 
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This was a very enjoyable stream. We discussed the importance of keeping traditions alive and our ancient holidays- particularly Halloween! 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-qGRdfD8FM
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HearthandHelm

Our tote bags are being hand screen printed by a fellow folkish lady right here in the USA! the s...

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HearthandHelm

Announcements! Fun ones. . . Merch! We are excited to announce that we will have our first merch-...

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Sunday was such a blissful Autumn day here in southern Appalachia. Mind you, I broke out the Autu...

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HearthandHelm

“Pumpkin” Spice Muffins With Cream Cheese Frosting

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*The stories and information shared on this episode are personal anecdotes only and are not professional advice. DO YOUR OWN research before trying to use ANY new parts or whole of herbs, plants or mushrooms-- and consult a professional medical practitioner.

********************Hello Everyone!!**********************

Thank you for joining us for an interesting chat with a fellow pagan mother, who is also a homeschooler, homesteader and a folk wildcraft herbalist.

In these modern times, we seek to keep alive the beautiful aspects of our folk ways while marching forward in gratitude for this life which we have been gifted by our ancestors. The seasons are changing; autumn is nigh- indeed- the autumn equinox. With the changing of this season we are harvesting, not only those crops we have grown, but also the metaphysical harvests of our minds and lives.

Join us for a discussion on homesteading, self preservation in the wake of the threat of a compromised Western civilization. Hear about the herbs we are picking and using right now, but more importantly, the ways we are seeking a deeper connection with these herbs. Heather comes from a farming/ homesteading background and was much influenced by her grandparents who held a deep connection to their local community.

****************************************


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMCyYpfnnPI
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HearthandHelm

I have reached for the Tylenol on more occasions than I would like to say, when it has come down ...

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HearthandHelm

I am not sure if it is the changing of the seasons, perhaps, since autumn is such a special seaso...

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Cleansing the Blood, in-

The Kitchen That Never Sleeps...


Hello beautiful people! I have been writing blog posts here in my mind, but that does not transfer the info and stories to you as I wish it could- ha! Alas, I am finally finding a moment to carve out the space to sit and type out one of the things I have been wanting to write to you about!

Recently, a friend visited us with his Russian wife. They were here to buy produce, but really- to do so much more than that. They were here to take in the scenery of the hillside, the trees, the dragonflies, and the gardens. They don't see the weeds, or, perhaps they do see them but it is the way they see them that is special. They do not see the weeds and off-looking fruits as failure or disappointment. Our friend's wife especially has the eye for everyday magic and spending time with her, albeit limited, walking the gardens and searching for old spring beets in the overgrown bed, is refreshing on a spiritual level. Her eyes are wide at my overgrown flower beds which reminds me to look with fresh eyes..

In all the years of market gardening I have, over time, come to forget the little joys of all the little magic things in the garden. Sad, I know- but such is the way of turning a hobby into an income opportunity with most things... It is not as though my eye and spirit for these things is completely gone. I do still take time to absorb the sunsets and observe a majestic creature such as a praying mantis- but in general, I seldom allow myself the luxury (necessity, rather) of slowing down enough to really soak it all in. It is truly a gift and a privilege in this modern world to live even a thread closer to the way my ancestors did, and for this life I am grateful....

So, as my new Russian friend and I were strolling the weedy late summer gardens, we happened upon her favorite- the beets. I have yet to meet a Russian or a Northern European who did not cherish BEETS. I myself hold them in high regard as a top favorite vegetable. Not only are they delicious, but they are also very nutritious, full of vitamins and minerals. I also like how well they store for long periods of time, whether in the cellar or the ground.

I have been making a lacto-fermented beverage for many years, known in the U.S. by "foodies" as beet kvass. My Russian friend shared her recipe with me, which is handed down in her family. Naturally, I cherished this gift of her hand written recipe, but I was especially intrigued by the unique ingredients.

The basic beet kvass I have known and brewed over the years comes from the book, Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon. It calls for peeled and chopped beets, sea salt, filtered water, and a dash of whey to start fermentation. While this is a perfectly delicious and nutritious beverage, this new (to me) recipe is my new preferred method. I love the creativity and the addition of ancestral sacred plant ingredients such as Oak leaves.

The finished beverage was the most delicious beet kvass I have ever tasted! Intensely rich, nice and salty, and very full bodied.

 It is said that this lacto-fermented beverage is very healing to the blood and also helps prevent or heal cancer and other ailments. As for flavor- if you remotely enjoy pickle juice, you will love beet kvass. It is less harsh on the sourness, but still sour and salty enough. Try drinking a glass at meal times. I especially like it with scrambled eggs in the morning or with a toasted piece of sourdough slathered in raw butter, 

Here is the amazing Beet Kvass recipe from Russia:

1.) Peel and chop 3 to 4 medium sized beets. Chop into large chunks and place in a half gallon glass mason jar. (Do not be tempted to mince or grate the beets, as that will cause too sweet a mixture which would lead to alcohol fermentation) 

2.) Add one to one and a half tablespoons of sea salt and cover with warm water.

3.) Add some or a combination of the following, to taste:

Oak leaves, coriander seeds, black peppercorns, horseradish leaves or flowers, blackberry leaves, dill leaves or flowers. 

4.) Place on top a piece of "the dry dark bread, but remove after one night".

5.) Observe the fermentation for about 6 days depending on temperature. 



*** Note: I lacked coriander seeds so I used a dash of cumin powder. I also lacked peppercorns, so I used ground black pepper. I forgot to remove the bread after one night and left in in for two. I used my homemade rye and einkorn sourdough but I would imagine any sort of dark dense bread could work if it is fresh. 


*** I just love the addition of the herbs and spices and the tannin-rich leaves. I have heard of using a piece of bread to start folk ferments of the alcoholic type, but never for a vegetable lacto-ferment- so I thought this was a really cool addition. 

After the fermentation is done you can shake the jar really well and drink a cup a day or however much you want. I found it necessary to "burp" the jars during the first several days of fermentation, as in, slightly unscrew the lids off and then back on again to release air pressure They fermented beautifully in this way. You will see bubbles inside.

You can also store this beverage for several months in the refrigerator. I made one gallon and as soon as it was finished fermenting, we drank it all down, saving a wee bit to share with another friend. 

Happy fermenting from,

The Kitchen That Never Sleeps

Thank you to our generous subscribers and supporters. If you have not subscribed and you would like to see more of this, please consider doing so right here for as little as $1 per month. 
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HearthandHelm
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Story Time! A reading of "Children of the North Lights" with homeschool lesson extensions in the show notes: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4at_fbb4Z4
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An interview with Hunter M Yoder, Pennsylvania Dutch Hex Artist.

History, Culture, Lore, Hexology, of the Pa Dutch & More.

What is the difference between barn signs and hex signs? Who were the PA Dutch? What is the significance of our ancient ancestral symbols and how can we relate to them today?

Reading his captivating book, 'Der Volksfreund', many questions have arisen in my mind. We discuss Hunter's beautiful and spiritually moving art in his hex signs. Hunter is an experienced hexologist; owner and artist at The Hex Factory- check out his awesome work here:

https://www.instagram.com/thehexfactory/

Purchase his work here:

https://www.huntermyoder.com/apps/webstore/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iPITnvLKKk
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HearthandHelm

My New Favorite Way to Preserve Herbs From the Summer Garden. . . This is a very old technique an...

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"Get ready for a big dose of positivity and inspiration as we are joined by The Antlered One! He brings a unique and refreshing take on many subjects, mainly- our native European spirituality and folklore. During these uncertain times we draw strength from our gods and our ancestors. The Antlered One and his collaborators produce Europe & Diaspora, a bi-annual publication available for free pdf download. It's focus is on our unique ethnic heritage and cultural expression of our folkish bio-spirit. Other projects include their inspirational YouTube channels and live streams..."
https://youtu.be/tPKrWSnD3Ro
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HearthandHelm

Chanterelle MushroomsAn ancient and sacred wild food. . .

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Thank you so much to our new (and old) subscribers and tipster! We hope you know how grateful we ...

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So, You're Thinking About Homeschooling. . . .

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We would like to invest in some modest equipment to improve the quality of our shows, eventually. Financial gifts through subscriptions will also help cover our costs for recording software, etc. We will also be using the funds from this podcast to help supplement our family income, as we are all stay/work at home moms, who homeschool our children.

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