Survive the Jive profile
Survive the Jive
Survive the Jive
I need your help! I have made informative videos about history, paganism and traditional cultures from around the world for years. My channel depends on patrons to continue. As a patron, you get merch discounts and access to exclusive content! Do your bit to support unbiased European history broadcasting.
Subscribe
Send Message

Share

Tell people about this page...

Subscription Tiers

$3
per month
C8d36a3b c78d 4424 a15c 71d482ede406 120x120 119x12 251x251
Low level supporter

every little helps!

42 subscribers
Unlock
$10
per month
A3eb8ad1 6509 4a97 b0a1 a6fa7c6440bf 120x120 309x206 812x812
Very Valued Patron

You are really making a difference and helping me to keep doing this and spreading valuable information about the gods, and religions of pre-Christian Europe

33 subscribers
Unlock
$25
per month
Fc4a6552 9d50 422c afc7 158cd1b5e13d 120x120 77x4 447x447
Big Spender

If there were more people like you then the world would be a better place

6 subscribers
Unlock
$100
per month
7a8f6389 f144 4ef4 b298 c6da15f66729 120x120 21x69 686x686
King

You are a king; a ring breaker showering gold on a grateful subject. I will talk to you via an online call as often as once a month to answer whatever questions I can.

1 subscriber
Unlock

Features

  • You get access to exclusive Patron-only Jive-streams, early access, first Q's for AMA's and more!

Recent posts

B5ffe997 9343 4922 b024 6522db4428a5 120x120 248x250 6182x6182
Survive the Jive
Public post

JIVE BOOK REVIEW: The Shaman by John A. Grim


In this episode of the Jive Book Review we will look at The Shaman: Patterns of Siberian and Ojibway Healing by John A. Grim. He describes the common features of the figure known as "the shaman" by anthropologists which is found mainly in cultures of Siberian origin: with his focus mainly on the Yakut of Siberia and the Ojibwe Indians aka Chippewa, or Saulteaux Anishinaabe people of southern Canada and the northern Midwestern USA. I attempt to compare the features of the shaman and of shamanic religious practices to Indo-European religious customs, particularly in Nordic Germanic religion. 
The video version will be uploaded to YouTube next week.

https://www.spreaker.com/user/survivethejive/shamanism-book-review
Comments  loading...
Like(0)
Dislike(0)
B5ffe997 9343 4922 b024 6522db4428a5 120x120 248x250 6182x6182
Survive the Jive
Public post
Thor is a Viking god who was mainly worshipped in Scandinavia but also in Britain. There are sacred cult sites of Thor or Thunor in the UK, and the Norse god of thunder also shows up in some local folklore. This short film looks at a couple of interesting examples from Derbyshire and Surrey.

https://youtu.be/_B76Wkk_wxM
Comments  loading...
Like(2)
Dislike(0)
B5ffe997 9343 4922 b024 6522db4428a5 120x120 248x250 6182x6182
Survive the Jive
Public post

Wolcensmen interview


The man behind the "haaail haaiil" StJ theme tune was good enough to grace my podcast with an interview. Dan Capp of Wolcensmen discusses the pagan themes in the lyrics of some of my favourite selections from his discography in this musical podcast.

Enjoy and don't forget to subscribe to the Survive the Jive podcast on Spreaker, Apple podcasts, Spotify or whatever one you use!

Listen here

https://survivethejive.blogspot.com/2021/04/pagan-english-folk-music-with-dan-capp.html 

Comments  loading...
Like(1)
Dislike(0)
B5ffe997 9343 4922 b024 6522db4428a5 120x120 248x250 6182x6182
Survive the Jive
Public post

Anglo-Saxon Paganism: Elves, ents, orcs


What exactly are elves in the Anglo-Saxon pagan belief system? Did Anglo-Saxon pagans believe in an afterlife and Hell? I will answer all these questions in this video which is the second part of a 2 part series - I will also show you what their pagan temple at Yeavering looked like, and explain how the elves, orcs, dwarves, land wights and ents of their belief system were all classed as demons after Christianisation.

Sources:

Abram, C. ‘In Search of Lost Time: Aldhelm and The Ruin’, Quaestio (Selected Proceedings of the Cambridge Colloquium in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic), vol. 1, 2000.
Dowden, Ken (2000). European Paganism: The Realities of Cult from Antiquity to the Middle Ages.
Doyle, Conan. (2018). Dweorg in Old English: Aspects of Disease Terminology.
Gunnel, T., ‘How Elvish were the Elves?’ 2007.
Hall, A., 'Are there any Elves in Anglo-Saxon Place-Names?', Nomina: Journal of the Society for Name Studies in Britain and Ireland, 29 (2006), 61-80.
Hall, A., (2004). The Meanings of Elf, and Elves, in Medieval England. 2007.
Lund, J., "At the Water's Edge" in "Signals of Belief in Early England"
Lysaght, P. ‘the banshee: the irish supernatural death messenger’
North, R. 1997 Heathen gods in Old English literature.
Pollington, S. 2011. The Elder Gods: The Otherworld of Early England.
Price, Neil & Mortimer, Paul. (2014). An Eye for Odin? Divine Role-Playing in the Age of Sutton Hoo. European Journal of Archaeology.
Semple. S., A Fear of the Past: The Place of the Prehistoric Burial Mound in the Ideology of Middle and Later Anglo-Saxon England. (1998)

https://youtu.be/KuX5imRS-Zo
Comments  loading...
Like(2)
Dislike(0)
B5ffe997 9343 4922 b024 6522db4428a5 120x120 248x250 6182x6182
Survive the Jive
Public post

Jive Book Review: The Final Pagan Generation

You said you want it, so now here it is!

The Final Pagan Generation recounts the story of the lives and fortunes of the last Romans born before the Emperor Constantine converted to Christianity. Edward J. Watts traces their experiences of living through the fourth century’s dramatic religious and political changes, when heated confrontations saw the Christian establishment legislate against pagan practices as mobs attacked pagan holy sites and temples. Watts examines why the "final pagan generation"—born to the old ways and the old world in which it seemed to everyone that religious practices would continue as they had for the past two thousand years—proved both unable to anticipate the changes that imperially sponsored Christianity produced and unwilling to resist them. This book is relevant today due to obvious modern parallels.
https://youtu.be/6NYcbIPtsW8
Comments  loading...
Like(9)
Dislike(0)
B5ffe997 9343 4922 b024 6522db4428a5 120x120 248x250 6182x6182
Survive the Jive
Public post

The Royal Indo-European Horse Sacrifice


https://youtu.be/W-ZWBtDXm2g

The most important sacrificial animal in the original Indo-European religion was the horse - The very power of their kings depended on an elaborate ritual horse sacrifice. In this video we will look at the rite of horse sacrifice in various Indo-European traditions in order to get an idea of why the Proto-Indo-Europeans considered it such an important royal ritual and what it looked like. Beginning with the enormous Ashvamedha in India, and moving on to Rome's October Horse rite and ending on old Norse written sources combined with archaeological evidence from the Nordic Bronze age through to the Viking age - we get a pretty clear picture of the gruesome and often sexual rituals associated with the inauguration of kings and the necessary solar horse sacrifice. This video is mainly based on the recent book on the same subject by Kaliff & Oestigaard.

SOURCES:

Dumézil, G. 1970. ‘Archaic Roman Religion. Volume One.’ The John Hopkins University Press. Baltimore and London.
Eliade, M. 1993. ‘Patterns in Comparative Religion.’ Sheed and Ward. New York.
Eliade, M., ed., ‘Encyclopedia of Religion’ (NY: Collier Macmillan, 1987), VI:463;
Kaliff, A., & Oestigaard, T., ‘The Great Indo-European Horse Sacrifice: 4000 Years of Cosmological Continuity from Sintashta and the Steppe to Scandinavian Skeid’ (2020)
Outram, A., et al. ‘Horses for the dead: funerary foodways in Bronze Age Kazakhstan’ - (March 2011)
Puhvel, J.,  ‘Comparative Mythology’ 1987
Rowsell, T., Riding To The Afterlife: The Role Of Horses In Early Medieval North-Western Europe. (2012)
Sikora, M., ‘Diversity in Viking Age horse burial’ in The Journal of Irish Archaeology(Belfast: 2003-4). P.87.
Solheim, S. 1956. Horse-fight and horse-race in Norse tradition. Studia Norvegica No. 8. H. Aschehoug & Co. (W. Nyaard). Oslo. 
Veil, Stephan & Breest, Klaus & Grootes, P. & Nadeau, Marie-Josée & Huels, Matthias. (2012). A 14 000-year-old amber elk and the origins of northern European art. Antiquity. 86. 660-673. 
Comments (4) loading...
Like(6)
Dislike(0)

The subscription gives you:
  • Access to Star's profile content.
  • Ability to support your Star by contributing – one-time or recurring.
  • Means to reaching out to the Star directly via Instant Messenger.
This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through this website. Continue to use this website as normal if you agree to the use of cookies. View our Privacy Policy for the details. By choosing "I Accept", you consent to our use of cookies.