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rich711
rich711
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rich711

New C-C article a new "study" claims men who like sports cars have small penises. I take a look a...

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Happy New Year, 2023 newsletter!

I hope you all had a Merry Christmas and a nice start to the year and end to 2022!

I just wanted to give you all a newsletter regarding what I am working on in 2023 and a summary of 2022. 

First, the summary. To begin, I will candidly admit 2022 was a rather rough year for me. It seems that a lot more went wrong than went right. I had some work and health issues that made things difficult for me. And frankly, looking back over the past five years of my life, it was non-stop and exhausting. In the years of 2018-2022, I published Liberalism Unmasked, went through law school, moved twice, published 35 or so articles on Counter-Currents, passed the bar, jumped into the legal field head first, participated in the Cville lawsuit, J6 defenses, the covid vaccine legal battle, adopted cats, one that almost died in the hospital All with no break, and lost a couple of close friends. By the Summer of 2022, I was entirely run down. 

With that said, 2022 did have a few bits of success. I published the viral Ice Cream Machines & Societal Disintegration piece about the McDonald's ice cream machine's maladies. A review of The Batman, a part II of "Why I Write" after Robin's funeral, and The Fading Memory of American Homeownership on Counter-Currents, along with several blog posts here, such as about my trip to Canada in my early 20s. We released two new episodes of Dark Academia, one about Kanye West and the other about recent SCOTUS decisions. On the legal front, I stayed very busy with free speech matters, protecting people like us from being harassed by the government for their legally protected speech. I wrapped up a few cases that were not political but for community members needing a little legal help. Despite it all, still, a productive year that I'm proud of. 

As usual, I was hoping to publish more of the longer articles I have been working on - this brings me to 2023! 

I will continue to be available to the community as a legal resource. To be honest, it's not something I enjoy, but it is one of those things I'm afraid would not be there otherwise. 

There are three main goals I have for writing long-from this year. I hope they are achievable, but I know time will be a constraint again. The first is to finish the sequel to Liberalism Unmasked. It is coming along slowly and steadily, very high quality and incisive. There are a few of the pre-order supporter slots left if you are interested. Just DM me here or on any platform about it. 

The next is to finish the two very in-depth pieces in the war against whites series. The War Against White Children and The War Against White Neighborhoods. I have been working on both, with well over 100 hours in them combined. They are akin to the previously published War Against Whites in Advertising and the War Against White Women. As with the first two installments, these two have a tremendous amount of background research going into them, a massive survey of articles, interviews, and more. The advertising article took over 100 hours, and I spent over a year on it. These next two will be similar, and I want to finish both in 2023. I wish I was able to publish on a consistent frequency, such as monthly or so. But the subject matter and the depth and breadth of what I try to cover are just too much for that. Although that is stressful, on the one hand, it is nice to publish things that hold up so well and stand out so much. 

Finally, I want to publish one of the more "fun" articles I have in the works. They will be shorter and of a slightly less dire nature and tone. There's a Halloween one in the works, one about the psychology of fashion, notes on nostalgia. They are some interesting things people will enjoy. A bit more light-hearted. Well, not the nostalgia one. But different. 


These goals are going to essentially be third in line for my new priorities. I'm going to first focus on my health, then work and finances, and then writing. I think it will make me the most productive and allow for the highest quality of work and longevity. 

Again, I know it is not a high volume of content, but I hope you understand the time I put into these, and hopefully, they are worth it. 

I really appreciate the support from all of you. It means the world. And without it, I don't think I would be able to make the time to keep writing at this place in my life and career. 

Thank you again, take care, and talk soon.

Always,

Rich

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rich711

Dark Academia, Episode 7: Fun op-eds and Cultural Marxism

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Dark Academia, Episode 6: Kanye Kampf

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My Formative Trip to Canada (2012)
In the fall of 2012, in my early 20s, I visited Canada, Toronto specifically, with a childhood friend. The background to the trip was my friend had just gotten out of the military, and I had just gotten out of a somewhat intense relationship. We were both looking toward what would be next in our lives, but also a bit stuck in a sort of limbo. My friend thought it might be a good idea to get away from Ohio for a week, he had another friend in Canada he wanted to visit, and we decided to make the scenic fall drive up to the capital city of Ontario. 

City & Architecture.
Toronto is an incredibly walkable city, and we moved around mostly on foot with a late-night cab ride or two. When a city is walkable, you experience it more intimately than via car or public transit. You have more time to look at the city's details and absorb the "feel" of it all. 

A considerable amount of what makes up the feel of a city is the combination of the architectural styles, the people, and a bit of land use and zoning. For the latter, I mean how far building setbacks must be, the districts and uses that are allowed or not due to zoning regulations, and the mix of types of zoning in a particular area. 

What struck me most was the eclectic mix of traditional and modern architectural styles. Some of which seemed to mesh well in an interesting symmetry. Others were as discordant as one could imagine. The worst offender I experienced was the Royal Ontario Museum. We were coming from lunch and walking towards Eaton Centre. I turned the corner and confronted the most jarring architectural experience I have ever had. 

It was the Royal Ontario Museum. Half of the building was built in the 20th century in a traditional style taking design cues from the Renaissance and Romanesque Revival. Beige brick and stone, arched windows with muntins and grids, and decorative pillars make up the original building. The new addition is a jagged shard type of structure, graphed onto the original form in a way that reminds one of a stitched-together monster from horror fiction. The style of the crystal shard is called Deconstructivist by architect Daniel Liebeskind, notable for his Jewish Museum in Berlin. 

Not even the scaling of the crystal shard was settling. It was all very inhuman and bizarre. The way my mood and thoughts shifted immediately upon walking near the structure would forever change my view of city planning and architecture's role in our day-to-day lives. 

The materials affect one similarly. In contrast with steel and glass arranged in unnatural shapes, vernacular materials like wood and stone or brick from the local area create vastly different experiences. 

Finally, the realization of why civilizations are incompatible become so clear while staring at the horrific cancer emerging from the museum. What we find beautiful, they find terrifying. What makes them feel at ease, makes us recoil.

Royal Ontario Museum


Diversity in the Town Square -Younge-Dundas Square and Eaton Centre Mall

I sat down in Dundas Square. It was a beautiful afternoon, chilly, with the sun shining. The Square was particularly busy that day. I was having something to drink and a rest from the walking before heading into Eaton Centre. Dundas Square is the intersection of Yonge Street and Dundas Street East, two major roads in Toronto. The Square sees over 100,000 people through the scramble each day. There is a considerable number of electronic signs and billboards, reminding one of Times Square or Piccadilly Circus. In short, it is a perfect place to people watch and see the world go by. 

Dundas Square
As with stumbling upon the Royal Ontario Museum's Abrahamic addition, I had another jarring experience in the Square. Under the brightly illuminated billboards as the sun was fading, I looked around, and it struck me -- I was the only White person I could see. Anywhere. 

In 1988, Canada passed a law called the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, which enshrined the government's policy into law. The stated goal of the act is to promote and protect the cultural diversity of Canada, which in part rewrites the history of Canada into a nation that has always been multicultural in the sense that we understand the word in its common usage. Further, "multicultural" does not mean British and French, the founding stock of Canada. 

And a mere 24 years later, I was the only White man in one of the busiest pedestrian intersections in the world. 

I met back with my friend, and we went to Eaton Centre. The experience was similar to that of Dundas Square. Although Eaton Centre uses steel and glass, it is styled after Milan's Galleria, featuring vaulted ceilings and multi-level shopping. I appreciated the history of indoor shopping reflected in its design.

Eaton Centre


We stopped at the food court. I think it was in the basement of the Centre. It was full of people, most of them not what I picture when I think "Canadian." If you recall the Raman scene, it was a very surreal Blade Runner experience. I did not even hear much English spoken, or French, for that matter. The dining options were vast. I cannot recall specifics other than dozens of options for all types of food. I ordered a veggie burger and fries from a burger stand. I also remember there was a vast amount of Asian cuisine, which perfectly matched the patron demographic of the mall.

Blade Runner - 1982


In many ways, Toronto was like looking into the future. It was the perfect global city, a beacon on the hill for the staunch globalists. The demographics say the city is still half White; if that's true, they must not go out as much. The city being mostly White and Asian, the crime rate isn't very high, according to the sources I found. With that said, I never felt at home or at ease in the city. Nothing replaces proper social capital, the kind that comes from understanding the norms and customs of your own people. The economy could be doing well, crime can be low, and the food court bustling, but it's not ours, and ultimately that is what matters. 

The Exchange Rate

The apartment building where we were staying was foreign to me as a native Ohioan. It was a highrise, 40 stories or so; we were staying on the 22nd floor. I spent a lot of time on the balcony looking out over the other apartment towers that seemed endless. That itself was foreign to me. The concept of a "city apartment tower" was something that I both loved and found dystopian. Most of the tower residents did not have cars. Those who did could buy a parking pass and park their car on one of the several floors of a subterranean garage. Most of the vehicles in the underground car park were quite high-end; Bentleys and Ferraris, and AMG Mercedes were not uncommon. The arrangement of poor students living in the same building as wealthy business people was another oddity to me. Above the garage, but below the apartments, was a mall and amenities. There was a laundromat, restaurants, a movie theatre, a few shops, a small grocery, a food court, and a bank. I found this quite pleasant overall and enjoyed the partially underground mall hidden away from most of the world. It served the residents of the building and the few nearby towers. You can reach the mall from other towers via tunnels. 

Although most places in Toronto seemed content to accept American dollars, I wanted to pay in Canadian dollars. I don't fully recall why that was. I think I found it to be the proper thing to do. It is frustrating when people go to another country that is not theirs and insist on not even attempting to participate in the norms of the country they find themselves. 

I handed the bank teller a $100 bill, and he handed me back about $96 Canadian. I must have looked a bit confused. He replied with a half-hearted smile, "the US dollar isn't what it used to be." He said it with almost pity, as if I was a rube from some backward nation. And maybe I was. 

The exchange rate was shocking for a couple of reasons. First, as an American, most books in bookstores here have the US price and the Canadian price, and the Canadian price has been higher for as long as I can remember. Second, I had been to Canada with my parents as a kid. My dad always loved trains. We took train rides into the Canadian wilderness on a couple of trips. My mom would give me money to buy snacks on the train from the food car, and I was always so excited at how much more purchasing power a $10 bill had in Canada over the US. 

But now, a man in his early 20s, realizing that the world has changed, in a bank in the basement of an apartment complex, humiliated with a debased fiat currency. Obama was president at the time, and no experience more than that made it more clear to me that there was an effort to knock the United States down a few rungs in the global hierarchy. As a country, we were becoming more equal to the rest, and I felt so embarrassed to be from a place that had fallen so far. 

That exchange rate experience would send me down a lifelong path of distrusting anything in traditional finance. This scene would stick with me forever and alter how I viewed cash, work, assets, and finance. When I became aware of Bitcoin, among other things, the pieces fell into place, and it all made sense. 

FIN
My autumn 2012 expedition to Canada was many things to me. It was sad, exciting, humiliating, hilarious, bizarre, foreign, and familiar. The range of emotions and thoughts were as diverse as Dundas Square and Eaton Centre. I came home not a changed man but the same man with a few new goals and considerations. I learned so much about the future of navigating a Western world that is more diverse (less White) with each passing day. I found firsthand that what is welcomed progress to one group is an alien dystopia for another. And perhaps most importantly, I realized that you cannot passively defend a status quo but that your desires and goals must be brought forth with complete action and assertion of will. 

I hope to visit Canada again sooner or later. Seeing Quebec City and skiing the Canadian Rockies are on my travel and cultural expeditions list. But when I do, it will be as a different man than the one seeing Toronto ten years ago. That much is for certain. 

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rich711
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Under the Friday Night Lights 
Last Friday was my high school's rival football game and alumni night. I do not usually attend most years, but it was a home game, and the football team has been doing remarkably well. But ultimately, the weather and the mood were just right. I've been returning to more and more of my old haunts as of late. 
When I was in high school, I'm not sure I went to a single football game. I had a job and skipped a grade. There was little time left in my week to spend. This night was my first time back to an event in many years. It was nice to see my school was still mostly homogenous like it was. 
I've been to this field and stadium countless times, deep into the nights when I was the only soul—usually running bleachers or doing some track work. The stadium was packed, standing room only. Seeing it completely alive with over 5,000 people was surreal. 
I ran into some of my old teachers and classmates. Always met with warm handshakes and hugs. We would briefly catch up and continue on. It felt right. It felt like the "old America." The one that doesn't exist anymore, but one that could have. 

I stood along the fence in front of the wildly spirited student section. Nearly everybody was wearing all black, one of the school's colors. I was too, not planned; I tend to wear mostly black clothes. 

The section would chant at the referees, the rival team, the rival fans, hold signs, jeer and mock. I loved it.
You could smell the fallen leaves from the forest behind the stadium, and the food cooking on the concession stand grills in the brisk evening air. 
Being rival night, you could feel the tension and perhaps a bit of animosity before kickoff. The rival team scored early in the first quarter, followed by many missed plays by both teams until a home team field goal in the second quarter. A series of first downs lead to a home touchdown with a good extra point right before halftime. 
During halftime, both school bands played for seven or so minutes. My high school performed part of their competition set, which was death themed. A bit odd, perhaps, but perfectly in-line with my personal "brand." A sort of memento mori and quite moving. They played a marching band rendition of Hello by Adele -- it was perfect. 
People returned from the busy concession stand with hot chocolate and food, filing back into the bleachers to watch the third-quarter kickoff.
The home team scored two touchdowns in the third, one that made the house go wild. A punt into the endzone, caught by the rivals, fumbled, and dove on by the home team for recovery and touchdown. The press box flicked the stadium lights off and on in celebration; cheerleaders threw mini-footballs and shirts into the crowd, we were all jumping up and down and hugging each other. 
The high would soon come back down as the next kickoff would be returned by the rivals in short succession, closing the score to three points again. 
A few more touchdowns were traded in a fight to the bitter end, ultimately concluding with a three-point victory for the home team, my high school alma mater.
The band came out to celebrate, flags with the school name ran back and forth along the track, and the bleachers cleared. The student section stormed the field in great defiance. They were jumping over fences and people to greet the players and coaches. I looked over the field at the rival seating section -- it too was cleared. They were already on their way home. This night, there was no lineup of teams to shake hands. 
A beautiful autumn night. Despite all the drudgery, there are still some nice things worth experiencing and worth preserving. 
I will most certainly be back. 


 


 

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Full-time journalism, legal show production, more pixel art, more cozy images, more of everything. | Total takeover, firing on all cylinders. | Cost of readership would drop, we would reach more and more people with these stories, and the content would come more often. | At this goal I can hire people to help me with content, add video production and audio recordings of articles, and really begin to expand the entire operation. I would like audio versions of all of the content to ensure people who cannot read well or travel often are able to have access to the stories. We are the stewards of our people and must care for all of them. | In addition to full-time writing, the legal podcast, and a community resource, I will hire a secretary, PR manager, and a guard-pupper to alert me of intruders. | The pupper will probably be a beagle or german shepherd, the secretary will be cute, the PR manager will be friendlier than I am.

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