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Insect Personality, And The New Evolution Deniers w/ Colin Wright

Hello, everybody! To end the week, I bring you an interview with Dr. Colin Wright. He is Eberly Fellow in the Department of Biology at Pennsylvania State University. His research explores the effects of animal personality on collective behavior and colony success. Using a combination of laboratory and field experiments, he tests for relationships between group personality composition, inter-colony differences in collective behavior and behavioral flexibility, and colony performance. He uses social spiders (genus Stegodyphus) and paper wasps (genus Polistes) to probe these topics.

In this episode, we focus on insect personality. We start by discussing how we can properly study animal personality, and what it is about. We also talk about insect personality at the individual and collective levels, we ask if it can be facultative, and we refer to behavioral plasticity. We also mention the impact of human intervention in these species’ habitats, group and multilevel selection, and how keystone individuals influence collective learning and group success. We explore if it is possible to gain some insights about animal personality that could be extrapolated from these insect societies to other social animals. Finally, we go through some of the main topics of a Quillette article by Dr. Wright, “The New Evolution Deniers”, and refer to issues regarding primarily sex and gender.

https://youtu.be/ECLq8ONVuZ4

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2X4Tmxx
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The Dissenter

Anthropology, And The Barga...

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Bonobo Societies, And Comparative Psychology w/ Zanna Clay

Hello, everybody! We begin the week with an interview with Dr. Zanna Clay. She is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Durham University. She is a comparative and developmental psychologist with expertise in primatology. She studies and compares great apes and young children in order to investigate the evolutionary and developmental basis of hominid social cognition and behavior. Her main interests are the development & evolution of social cognition and communication, focusing on empathy, language and social learning.

In this episode, we focus mostly on bonobo societies and their behavior. We talk first about their sociality. Then we go through the different types of calls that they have, related to food, alarm calls, and sex. We also ask how far back in evolution do vocalizations go, and the cognitive tools needed to produce them, and also about a possible phylogenetic relationship between animal vocalizations and human language. We explore the social functions of sex in bonobo societies. We also discuss socio-emotional competence in bonobos, and how we can compare their development with the one of human infants. Finally, we address the question if there is a best primate (great Ape) model to compare to humans.

https://youtu.be/S76bSvOK2bE

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2vWll7s

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The Fifth Beginning, And The Lifeways Of Hunter-Gatherers w/ Robert Kelly

Hello, everybody! To end the week, I have an interview with Dr. Robert Kelly for you. He is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Wyoming. Dr. Kelly has shaped and contributed much to our understanding of hunter-gatherer societies. He has a deep interest in Western North American archaeology, especially in the Great Basin area. Current understanding of hunter-gatherer mobility and foraging patterns are also influenced strongly by his research, fieldwork, and ethnology. By examining the Pleistocene colonization of the Americas by examining artifacts and lithic technology, Dr. Kelly reconstructs past life-ways and compares them to current foraging societies, and examines human adaptation to climate change during different periods in the past. He’s the author of books like The Foraging Spectrum: Diversity in Hunter-Gatherer Lifeways, and The Fifth Beginning: What Six Million Years of Human History Can Tell Us about Our Future.

In this episode, we focus for the most part on Dr. Kelly’s book, The Fifth Beginning. But first we discuss the discipline of Archaeology in its strengths and limitations. Then, we get into the meat of the book, and talk about the first four beginnings: the beginning of technology; the beginning of culture; the beginning of agriculture; the beginning of the State; and the fifth beginning, which we are going through now, starting around 1500 CE. We also tackle how we might get to solve current urgent global-scale problems, like climate change. As a final topic, we explore issues surrounding hunter-gatherers, how we think about them as a monolithic social entity, and we also refer to thinks like variability, human universals, and evolutionary psychology and “human nature”.

https://youtu.be/oiT_S2v6Gfc

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2UF5WAV

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Humans and Robots: Ethics, Agency, and Anthropomorphism w/ Sven Nyholm

Hello, everybody! Today, I bring you my second interview with Dr. Sven Nyholm. He is an Assistant Professor of Philosophical Ethics at Utrecht University. His main areas of research are applied ethics (especially the ethics of technology), ethical theory, and the history of ethics. More specifically, he has recently published on love-relationships and biomedical enhancements, sex robots, motivation-enhancements, accident-algorithms for self-driving cars, deep brain stimulation, happiness and well-being, meaning in life, and interpersonal respect and moral reasoning. His work also focuses on the ethics of automated driving, human-robot collaboration, deep brain stimulation (including its effect on the self), and disability and the goods of life. He is especially interested in how robotization and other types of automation affect traditional human values, as well as in existential questions raised by new technological developments. He has a new book coming out, Humans and Robots: Ethics, Agency, and Anthropomorphism.

In this episode, we dig into the main topics of his book, Humans and Robots. We refer to the fact that there are different kinds of robots and how we should deal with them. We talk about anthropomorphization, and the intuitions people have about robots’ minds. We raise the question about the ay we treat robots spilling into how we treat other humans. We address agency and moral responsibility in the context of self-driving cars and military robots. We ask if we can establish proper relationships with other robots. Finally, we go through what kinds of minds robots can have and what that would mean, and also if robots can also me moral agents and be “good”.

https://youtu.be/oCb8XwDbVBo

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2vRi89n

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Health, Affect, Physical Activity, And Addiction w/ Renee Magnan

Hello, everybody! Today, I bring you an interview with Dr. Renee Magnan. She is Associate Professor and Director of Experimental Training in the Department of Psychology at Washington State University. She applies social psychological theory to address issues in preventive health behaviors and health behavior promotion. Specifically, much of the research in her lab focuses on understanding the role that affect (e.g., worry) plays on health decisions and behavior (e.g., smoking cessation, exercise, cannabis). She is interested in both how one’s feelings about health behaviors may influence their decisions to engage in health behavior and also how health behaviors may influence one’s feelings. Both perspectives can provide important insight to identify targets for interventions to prevent negative health consequences and promote wellness.

In this episode, we focus on Health Psychology. We dig into what is affect and how it influences health behavior. We refer to the negative consequences of physical inactivity, and its relationship with mental health. We also address addictive behaviors, and adolescence and risky behavior of all types. Finally, we talk about the types of health messaging that work the best, and also problems with medical advice and treatment compliance, and how we can improve them.

https://youtu.be/kAJKw5rMzQM

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2J83Tjp

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The Sociality And Culture Of Whales w/ Hal Whitehead

Hello, everybody! I end this week with an interview with Dr. Hal Whitehead. He is Professor in the Department of Biology at Dalhousie University. His work focuses mainly on the behavior, ecology, population biology and conservation of two species of deep-diving whale: the sperm and northern bottlenose. He and his team have ongoing research projects on sperm whales in the eastern Pacific (since 1985) and Atlantic (since 2004) on northern bottlenose whales off Nova Scotia (since 1998), and on pilot whales off Nova Scotia Isince 1998). They spend periods of weeks at sea on board ocean-going sailing boats collecting acoustic, visual, photographic, genetic and oceanographic data.

In this episode, we talk about several aspects of whale sociality, focusing on the ones Dr. Whitehouse studies the most, like the sperm whale, the northern bottlenose whale, and the pilot whale. We discuss parental investment, alloparenting, and menopause. We talk about how their social networks are established, and how they relate to their culture. We address whale culture in general, and also how they have cumulative culture, and some examples of gene-culture coevolution in whales and dolphins. Finally, we refer to whale conservation.

https://youtu.be/KCnWsD4ZS54

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/3dho8cm

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The Dissenter
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Human Behavior, Evolution, Morality, and Free Will w/ Robert Sapolsky

Hello, everybody! Today, I have another big name for you. Dr. Robert Sapolsky is the John A. and Cynthia Fry Gunn Professor of Biology and Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery at Stanford University. Dr. Sapolsky is the author of several informative and comical books that present cutting edge psychoneurobiological knowledge in an enjoyable, easy to read format. He's also a renowned researcher and award-winning professor at Stanford University. He’s the author of books like Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers, The Trouble with Testosterone: And Other Essays on the Biology of the Human Predicament, A Primate's Memoir, Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst.

In this episode, we cover some broad topics on human behavior. We talk about group selection and the extended evolutionary synthesis, our morality, free will, and behavioral flexibility.

https://youtu.be/S9pqdKP9tuk

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/33uvPr4
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O Que É A Ética? + Aborto E Eutanásia c/ Pedro Galvão

O Dr. Pedro Galvão ensina no Departamento de Filosofia da Faculdade de Letras da Universidade de Lisboa, onde também é membro do Centro de Filosofia. Nesta unidade de investigação, pertence ao grupo LanCog.  É Diretor de Curso da Licenciatura em Filosofia e do Doutoramento em Ética, Democracia e Desafios Societais. Interessa-se por ética filosófica e também por várias questões de metafísica. No campo da história da filosofia, tem-se concentrado nos grandes filósofos dos séculos XVII e XVIII, bem como na filosofia moral britânica da Era Vitoriana. Tem vindo a defender obsessivamente o consequencialismo das regras, que consiste, grosso modo, na ideia de que devemos agir segundo o código moral cuja aceitação colectiva resultaria nas melhores consequências. Traduziu para Português os Métodos do Sidgwick, o Utilitarismo do Mill e outras obras filosóficas. Escreve também ficção especulativa.

Neste episódio, falamos acerca ética. Primeiro, discutimos a distinção que algumas pessoas fazem entre ética e moral, e relacionamos a Ética com outros ramos da filosofia, nomeadamente a Epistemologia, a Metafísica e a Política. De seguida, abordamos o utilitarismo, e falamos do contratualismo de John Rawls. Então, entramos naquele que será talvez o maior problema da metaética, o da objetividade da ética, e as diferentes maneiras de tornar a Ética objetiva. Abordamos também o problema da discordância entre diferentes filósofos e pessoas comuns. Por fim, falamos sobre a ética do aborto e a ética da eutanásia, e todas os principais critérios, princípios e complicações associadas.

https://youtu.be/6F43pKQILd0

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/2QjjcKf

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Memory, Eyewitness Testimony, and Recovered Memory Therapy w/ Elizabeth Loftus

Hello, everybody! This Friday, I am releasing an interview with Dr. Elizabeth Loftus. She is a Distinguished Professor of Psychological Science and Law, and of Cognitive Science in the Departments of Psychological Science, and Criminology, Law, and Society at University of California, Irvine. She is also Fellow of the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. Dr. Loftus is best known for her ground-breaking work on the misinformation effect and eyewitness memory, and the creation and nature of false memories, including recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse. As well as her work inside the laboratory, she has been involved in applying her research to legal settings.

In this episode, we first talk about how memories can be interfered with, and refer to the misinformation effect. We also discuss if people rewrite their memories when they recall them. Then we get into the many issues with eyewitness testimonies, and how to improve on them. Finally, we also go through the repressed and recovered memory therapy, its several flaws, and how it affects patients and other potential victims. 

https://youtu.be/jbRNhCDp5yU

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/3aRx7Pq
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Reputation, Prosociality, Moral Character, and Lie Detection w/ Nadav Klein

Hello, everybody! Today, I have an interview with Dr. Nadav Klein for you. He is an Assistant Professor of Organisational Behaviour at INSEAD. His research focuses on the basic processes of judgment that affect how people make decisions, process information, and evaluate others and themselves. Some of the findings Nadav has explored are the surprising reputational benefits of being a little bit nice to other people, the ability of groups to detect lies, people's weak desire to be seen as moral and strong desire not to be seen as immoral, and people's overestimation of how much information they use to make decisions.

In this episode, we go through several topics in social psychology. We start with social reputation, how we attribute it to other people, the process of individuation, and the traits that people tend to associate with it, namely the ones that cluster around warmth and competence. We then talk about prosociality, bounded self-righteousness, and if people think their own and the character of other people can change, and the kinds of changes that they value and find more inspirational. We also briefly address if we are good lie detectors, and why we do it better in groups. Finally, we talk about subjective wellbeing and meaningfulness in life. 

https://youtu.be/0G_rfxa5s98

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/39PbnU4
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The Enlightenment, Cultural Evolution, and the Human Mind w/ Steven Pinker

Hello, everybody! It is with great honor that today I release my interview with Dr. Steven Pinker. He is a Johnstone Family Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. He conducts research on language and cognition, writes for publications such as the New York Times, Time and The Atlantic, and is the author of ten books, including The Language Instinct, How The Mind Works, The Blank Slate, The Stuff of Thought, The Better Angels of Our Nature, The Sense of Style, and most recently, Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress.

In this episode, we talk go through some of the main topics Dr. Pinker tackles in his work. We start by discussing a new hypothesis put forth by Joe Henrich and his collaborators, about the possible influence the Catholic Church had on the evolution of our WEIRD psychology and the Enlightenment ideas. We then talk about cultural evolution, morality from an evolutionary perspective, and human progress. We also address if our folk psychology tracks scientific findings on human behavior. We also talk about language, and AI. Finally, we go through two questions coming from a patron, about the cognitive niche hypothesis, and the WEIRD problem.

https://youtu.be/qs9VQlmZwMc

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/2IyKQyp

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Hello, everybody! We end this week with an interview with Bryony Cole. She is the host of sex tech podcast Future of Sex and works as a researcher and strategist in future human and technology fields. She is the world’s leading authority on sextech. Since launching the top-rated podcast, Future of Sex, Bryony has been on stages across the world, defining the direction of sextech for governments, technology and entertainment companies. Her wide body of research and annual Future of Sex report are considered the lead in industry insights. Bryony is an international speaker, published writer and producer, who has been featured on shows like Viceland and Technopia, and articles in Wired, TechCrunch, The New York Times, Playboy, Mashable, Motherboard, ABC, Financial Review, Brides, Glamour and many other global media.

In this episode, we address what the future might be reserving for us in terms of sexual experiences, human relationships and emergent sex technology. We go through the topic of how and why sex is still a social taboo. We clarify the fact that, even though we focus a lot on the technology, the future will also include the human relationships themselves. We refer to some non-normative sex preferences, and how society deals with “deviant” sex behavior. We then discuss modern sex education, particularly in the West, and the new challenges, particularly coming from learning how to deal with the virtual world, and things like social media. We talk about the complex intricacies of pornography and prostitution for both the consumer and the performer, connecting it with sex-positive feminism. We address technology like sex robots and teledildonics, and the new kinds of relationships and experiences that they already allow for. Finally, we briefly talk about new relationship styles, like polyamory, and the challenges involved there.

https://youtu.be/rYnPqtO9Heg

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/38x5EkD

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História e Evolução do Português, o AO, e os Nazis da Gramática c/ Marco Neves

Olá a todos! Hoje, trago-vos uma entrevista com Marco Neves. Ele é professor de tradução na Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, tradutor e diretor do escritório de Lisboa da Eurologos e colunista no Sapo 24. É também autor do blogue Certas Palavras, e de livros como “A Incrível História Secreta da Língua Portuguesa”, “Dicionário de Erros Falsos e Mitos do Português”, “Gramática para Todos — O Português na Ponta da Língua” e “O Galego e o Português São a Mesma Língua?”.

Neste episódio, falamos acerca de como realmente se fala Língua Portuguesa bem falada, sem purismos, nem essencialismos. Começamos por desancar os nazis da gramática. Depois, abordando as línguas como convenções sociais, introduzimos uma discussão acerca do AO 90, e as falhas nos argumentos de ambos os lados da barricada. Tratamos também a questão da língua nos seus diversos contextos. Por fim, percorremos alguns tópicos da história e evolução da Língua Portuguesa, da sua relação com o Galego, e da sua uniformização recente.

https://youtu.be/XTU3QFfI8u0

Link para versão em podcast (Anchor): http://bit.ly/2VShS4s

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The Dissenter

Origin Stories In The Scien...

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The Anthropology Of Identified Flying Objects w/ Michael Masters

Hello, everybody! We end this week with an interview with Dr. Michael Masters. He is Professor of Anthropology at Montana Tech. His research centers on investigating human ocular, orbital, midfacial, cerebral and neurocranial morphology, and how competition among these features may act to constrain the eye and surrounding ocular tissues during ontogeny, as it relates to the disparate incidence & severity of astigmatism and juvenile-onset myopia. Further research interests center on investigating hominin biocultural evolution, astrobiology, astronomy and the physics of time as they relate to the UFO phenomenon. On that pic, he has written a book, Identified Flying Objects: A Multidisciplinary Scientific Approach to the UFO Phenomenon.

In this episode, we focus on the thesis that Dr. Masters puts forward in his book, where he tries to explain the UFO phenomenon as being humans from the future backward time travelling. We go through the unreliability of the personal reports, and why we have to be careful about that. Then we get into the biological anthropology bit, and refer to trends in the evolution of the human body, mostly the head, for the past 6 million years, and how it could continue into the future. We also address the theoretical bases of time travel, and its many complications. Finally, we discuss what people from the future could have to gain from travelling back to the past.

https://youtu.be/j0r6ig0S3Jc

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/3825UYw

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The Grandmother Hypothesis w/ Kristen Hawkes 

Hello, everybody! Today, I bring you an interview with Dr. Kristen Hawkes. She is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at the University of Utah. Dr. Hawkes, an expert in human evolution and sociobiology, is the author of several studies on the “grandmother hypothesis,” which asserts that many of the characteristics that distinguish us from our ape ancestors are thanks to the thoughtful care of our grandmothers. Her research is based on ethnographic observation studies of hunter-gatherer communities such as the Aché and Hadza. She has also developed mathematical models to model evolution over time and trace the influence of grandmothers on human lifespan. Combining mathematical modelling and observational studies she also researches the effects of fire on ancient hunter-gatherers.

In this episode, we focus on the grandmother hypothesis. First, Dr. Hawkes tells us about how she got to study the Aché in Eastern Paraguay, and the Hadza in Tanzania, and the insights she got from them. We go on a bit of a tangent to talk about human foraging behavior, and why men hunt. Then, we discuss the grandmother hypothesis in its several dimensions, referring to how grandmothers during our evolutionary history contributed to the success of their grandchildren, and also increased their daughters’ fertility, for example. We also address the relationship between grandmothers and the evolution of human life history. Finally, we talk about the evolution of menopause, the role of grandfathers, and grandmothers in modern societies.

https://youtu.be/1M-5lv4muRg

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/2PvaSqo
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The Biological And Cultural Bases Of Language w/ Thom Scott-Phillips

Hello, everybody! This Monday, I am releasing an interview with Dr. Thomas Scott-Phillips. He is a Senior Research Scientist in the Social Mind Center and the Department of Cognitive Science, at Central European University, Budapest. In particular he studies communication, and how it makes us human. His first book, Speaking Our Minds, was reviewed as “The most important and the best book ever written on the evolution of language” and “The best linguistics book I’ve read in 10 years”. He’s written short pieces for outlets such as Aeon, Scientific American, The Conversation; and he has given public talks for TEDx, British Humanist Association, Skeptics In The Pub, Digital Science and others. His academic articles and broader interests span cultural evolution, primate communication, language acquisition, philosophy of language, and others.

In this episode, we talk about language and communication. We start with communication from a biological perspective, and then establish a bridge with language, and talk about its evolutionary foundations and the cognitive mechanisms associated with it. We also refer to the cognitive and anatomical tools that an organism needs to produce language. We also address the cultural evolution of languages, and discuss cultural attraction theory and the study of language in the lab. We go through some social aspects of language, referring to Michael Tomasello’s concept of shared intentionality, and phenomena like epistemic vigilance and the argumentative theory of reasoning. Finally, we talk about meaning.

https://youtu.be/hBkdOrXR9nY

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/37VeSGI

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Self-control, Gratification Delay, Ego-depletion, And The Replication Crisis w/ Michael Inzlicht

Hello, everybody! We end the week with an interview with Dr. Michael Inzlicht. He is a Research Excellence Faculty Scholar at the University of Toronto. His primary appointment is as Professor in the Department of Psychology, but he is also cross-appointed as Professor at the Rotman School of Management. Dr. Inzlicht conducts research that sits at the boundaries of social psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience. Although he has published papers on the topics of prejudice, academic performance, and religion, his most recent interests have been in the topics of self-control, where he borrows methods from affective and cognitive neuroscience to understand the underlying nature of self-control, including how it is driven by motivation.

In this episode, we focus most of our conversation of self-control and things related to it. First, I ask about social neuroscience, and what Dr. Inzlicht thinks are the kinds of insights we can get from neuroscience about social psychology phenomena. We then get into self-control, and talk about what is it, and the concept of self-control strength. We address a paper from 2018 that tried to replicate Walter Mischel’s marshmallow test, and the capacity to delay gratification. We also refer to one aspect of the recent APA guidelines for psychological practice with men and boys, namely the repression/suppression of emotions. Still about self-control, we discuss the interplay between emotion and cognition, the life outcomes associated with this ability, and if there are any good interventions proven to improve it. We then tackle aspects of the replication crisis in Psychology, and go through some examples of phenomena that have recently been questioned, like the ego-depletion effect and stereotype threat. 

https://youtu.be/fuA1l7bL954

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/38ZlbL7
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Evolution, Hierarchy, And Leadership w/ Richard Ronay

Hello, everybody! Today, I release an interview with Dr. Richard Ronay. He is Associate Professor of Leadership and Management at University of Amsterdam Business School. His research interests include power and status; social hierarchy; leadership; inequality; overconfidence; social intelligence; decision making; evolutionary psychology; and social neuroendocrinology.

In this episode, we focus on human social hierarchies and leadership. We first talk about social hierarchy from an evolutionary perspective, the different kinds of hierarchies that we can establish, and sex differences in competition. Then we discuss leadership, the traits that tend to go along with it, and the role that traits like overconfidence and risk-taking might play. We also refer to the relationship between hierarchy and group effectiveness, and the relationship between reversal learning (the ability to detect changing contingencies) and social success. Finally, we talk about risk-taking as a sexual display strategy.

https://youtu.be/-bQQp6ylrkE

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/2V4cv1P

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The Dissenter

The Theoretical Bases Of Ev...

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The Second Sexism; Discrimi...

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Never Home Alone; The Species We Live With w/ Rob Dunn

Hello, everybody! Today, I bring you an interview with Dr. Robert Dunn. He is William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor in the Department of Applied Ecology at North Carolina State University. He is known for efforts to involve the public as citizen scientists in arthropod surveys and bacterial flora studies. His projects include studies of belly button biodiversity, mites that live on human faces, ants in backyards, and fungi and bacteria in houses. He’s the author of five books, his most recent one being Never Home Alone: From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live.

In this episode, we focus on Never Home Alone. We discuss how living in homes changed our dynamics with other species, particularly species of insects, bacteria and fungi, and how some of them adapted to the home environment. We talk about how some of them are neutral, others beneficial, and still others detrimental to our health, and also about the importance of being exposed to biodiversity. We also get into the effects that the most common pets (cats and dogs) might have on us. We discuss food processing, how our houses promote the development of harmful species, and, finally, how in the future we might be able to garden the microorganisms we need.

https://youtu.be/i-zl9pergMI

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/2uL2L1v
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Animal Minds, Theory of Mind, And Animal Ethics w/ Kristin Andrews

Hello, everybody! We start the week with an interview with Dr. Kristin Andrews. She is York Research Chair in Animal Minds and Professor of Philosophy at York University (Toronto), where she also helps coordinate the Cognitive Science program and the Toronto Area Animal Cognition Discussion Group. Dr. Andrews is on the board of directors of the Borneo Orangutan Society Canada, a member of the College of the Royal Society of Canada, and the author of several books on social minds, animal minds, and ethics.

In this episode, we talk about how to properly study animal minds, and also issues regarding animal ethics. We start by discussing how difficult it is to study non-human animals’ behavior and minds, and Dr. Andrews presents the calibration method. We also discuss how we can use folk psychology as a starting point. We talk about the flaws with anthropomorphism and anthropectomy. We then get into the issue of theory of mind, and how to deal with consciousness in animal cognitive studies. Dr. Andrews also refers to recent exciting research that points to the possibility of plants also having consciousness and minds. Finally, we get into animal ethics, and discuss specifically issues related to how we can determine if there are other animals that also are moral agents, and how to study moral normativity in non-human animals. We end up by talking a bit about veganism.

https://youtu.be/raIpbVTh-pg

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/37fLKd8
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The Dissenter
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Nietzsche's Psychology And Epistemology w/ Mattia Riccardi

Hello, everybody! This Friday, I bring you an interview with Dr. Mattia Riccardi. He is Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Arts at the University of Porto. He does work in the areas of philosophy of mind, Nietzsche’s philosophy, Kant’s philosophy, 19th-century German philosophy, phenomenology, philosophy of perception, and philosophy of action.

In this episode, we focus mostly on Nietzsche’s psychology and epistemology. We talk about his thoughts on free will, consciousness, and introspection. We also discuss Nietzschean drives, and if they are homuncular. We also refer to his views on the embodied mind. Finally, we address his views on Kant’s metaphysics and epistemology, and his critique of the noumenon and of the notion of the “Thing In Itself”.

https://youtu.be/sLkJLNkEFbY

Link to podcast version (Anchor): http://bit.ly/2SqbvC9


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