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The Dissenter
#96 Heather Montgomery: Social Anthropology of Childhood and Child Labor

Dr. Heather Montgomery is a social anthropologist who studied for her PhD at Trinity College, Cambridge, which she wrote on child prostitution in Thailand. She has had jobs and research positions in Sussex, Norway, Texas and at Oxford. Her research interests are within Childhood Studies, especially the history and anthropology of childhood and children’s rights.

In this episode, we talk about what might be some cultural influences on childhood, and how boys and girls behave. We address the issue about how parents might look at their children as economic assets, and how that influences division of labor between the sexes, and child labor. We finish by talking a little bit about how people’s perceptions about children changed over time in the West, and some of the reason behind that change.

https://youtu.be/VxL0wNd05EY

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2ZrqPjG
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The Dissenter
Evolution And Clinical Psychology, Self-Esteem, And The Dark Triad w/ Philip Kavanagh

Hi, everybody! This Friday, I am releasing an interview with Dr. Phillip Kavanagh. He is an Associate Professor of Evolutionary Psychology at the Institute for Social Neuroscience, and Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of South Australia. Dr. Kavanagh lectures across both the undergraduate and postgraduate psychology programs, provides research supervision to honors, master's, and PhD students, and clinical supervision to students in the clinical program.

In this episode, we talk about the relationship between evolutionary psychology and clinical psychology, and the discipline of evolutionary clinical psychology. We go through some major issues, like how to properly classify something as a mental disorder/disease; how our modern environments differ in significant ways from the environments we evolved in, and the problems that brings, and the phenomenon of evolutionary mismatch; the several different schools of thought that we have in clinical psychology, and if it would be possible to unify them under a core theory; the difficulties in objectively evaluating patients; life history strategies, and the problems that arise when we have unfulfilled expectations. We also talk about personality variation, and the relevance of personality inventories, like the Big Five, in a clinical context; the sociometer theory, and its explanatory power; how our modern obsession with happiness might be problematic. Finally, we discuss recent literature on the Dark Triad and the Light Triad of human nature.

https://youtu.be/djqc2wHTUQs

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2MQcr3f
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The Dissenter
#95 Robert Kurzban: The Hidden Agenda of Our Minds, Modularity, and Politics

Dr. Robert Kurzban is a former Professor of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on the nature of evolved cognitive adaptations for social life. Dr. Kurzban has served as both the editor-in-chief of the journal Evolution & Human Behavior and President of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society. He’s also the author of the books Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite, and The Hidden Agenda of the Political Mind. 

In this episode, we talk about the approach to the mind as being composed by a multitude of evolved cognitive modules that helped us deal with problems during our evolutionary history. We go through some of the main topics of both of Dr. Kurzban’s books, and talk about how our subconscious mind works and some of the implications of it, particularly about a new perspective on phenomena like cognitive dissonance and self-deception. And we also go through some of the implications that it has for politics.

https://youtu.be/lCrzBJaqkbw

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2WEiK9H
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The Dissenter
#94 Athena Aktipis: Cooperation and Conflict, From Cells to Human Societies

Dr. Athena Aktipis is Assistant Professor in the Psychology Department at Arizona State University, co-Director of the Human Generosity Project and Director of Human and Social Evolution, and co-founder of the Center for Evolution and Cancer at the University of California, San Francisco. She is a cooperation theorist, theoretical evolutionary biologist, and cancer biologist who now works at the intersection of these fields. She will be having a book coming out in the near future, Evolution in the Flesh: Cancer and the Transformation of Life.

In this episode, we talk about what game theory is, and how it works; conflict between the mother and the fetus in the womb; walk away vs the traditional tit-for-tat cooperative strategies; the osotua system of the Masai, a need-based cooperative system; principles that rule interactions from the cellular to the societal levels, and how they can be applied to develop better tools to fight cancer.

https://youtu.be/lVX3WE6H4NA

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2WDmvAW
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The Dissenter
Domestic Violence, Child Abuse, And Modern Society w/ Viviana Weekes-Shackelford

Hi, everybody! Today, I bring you an interview with Dr. Viviana Weekes-Shackelford. She received her Ph.D. in evolutionary developmental psychology in 2011 from Florida Atlantic University. She is currently Visiting Assistant Professor in Sociology and Criminal Justice at Oakland University and Co-Director of the Evolutionary Psychology Lab. Her research over the years has been evolutionarily inspired and has had the broader goal of gaining a more comprehensive understanding of violence and conflict in families and romantic relationships. Her research interests and record cut across the psychological domains of forensics, development, social, personality, clinical, and criminology.

In this episode, we expand on the first interview I’ve had with Dr. Todd Shackelford, and talk about things related to human romantic relationships and parent-offspring conflict. First, we discuss the importance of parental investment theory in understanding where conflict in romantic relationships stems from, and the role that fathers play in raising children. We also try to conceive how this knowledge could translate into social policy, when it comes to child support and other kinds of social issues. Then, we talk about domestic violence as a set of evolved mate guarding tactics, and violence exerted on children on the part of genetic parents and stepparents. And, finally, before talking about the specific case of filicide-suicide, we go off on a tangent to talk about evolutionary mismatch and some ways by which modern environments might affect us, including technology like social media. 

https://youtu.be/1eIgvW2t5JA

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2Kib3UZ
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The Dissenter
#93 Steven Neuberg: The Evolutionary Bases of Stereotypes and Prejudices

Dr. Steven Neuberg is a Foundation Professor and chair of the Department of Psychology at Arizona State University (ASU). He is the co-director of the Kenrick-Neuberg Social Cognition Laboratory. He also founded the ASU Global Group Relations Project, a multidisciplinary and global study of factors, including religion, which shape intergroup conflict. Dr. Neuberg is a fellow of multiple scientific societies and the recipient of several teaching awards, including ASU’s 2012 Outstanding Doctoral Mentor Award.

In this episode, we talk about the evolutionary bases of stereotypes and prejudices; how they work and how they develop; universal stereotypes, related to age, sex, and ecology; xenophobia and ethnocentrism; the correct way to evaluate race stereotypes in the US, and the relationship with life history theory; religion and stereotypes; and how to better fight prejudices and their effects.

https://youtu.be/wKNJxKvQfn4

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2KEUa6e
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The Dissenter
#91 Lee Jussim: How Stereotypes Work, and the Current State of Social Psychology

Dr. Lee Jussim is Distinguished Professor, Chair and Graduate Director of the Department of Psychology at Rutgers University. He also runs the Social Perception Lab there. The lab studies how people perceive, think about, and judge others. He is a leader in the fields of person perception, stereotype accuracy and bias and has been integral in the initiative for viewpoint diversity which advocates to correct the inaccuracies in the field of social psychology research. In support of the latter, he helped start Heterodox Academy, a collection of academics pushing for improvements in their academic fields.

In this episode, the conversation is centered on stereotypes. We talk a little bit about the history of looking at stereotypes as inaccurate; how we can test their accuracy; if they affect people’s perception of the groups they’re targeted at; stereotype threats; self-fulfilling prophecies; the validity of implicit bias testing; and some issues with political bias in Social Psychology, and social constructivism.

https://youtu.be/U94jZkZ8ZEg

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2I5vGRK
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The Dissenter
Prosocial And Moral Development In Children And Adolescents w/ Gustavo Carlo

Hi, everybody! Today, I share an interview with Dr. Gustavo Carlo. He is Millsap Professor of Diversity in the Department of Human Development and Family Science at the University of Missouri. His research areas and interests include: Prosocial and moral development among children and adolescents; Temperament, family correlates, social cognition and emotions, and culture-related variables associated with such development; and Positive health and adjustment among Latino families and youth. He’s also been the recipient of several awards, including the 2017 Top Faculty Achiever from the University of Missouri, and the 2018 Outstanding Mentor Award from the Society for Research on Adolescence.

In this episode, we focus on prosocial and moral development in children and adolescents. We refer to the important contributions of genes and the environment, and the many complications associated with studying the different factors; the “stages” approach in developmental psychology; and the development of gender. We also talk about peer pressure, and the shared and non-shared environments; different social cognitions; and, finally, if development still occurs in adulthood.

https://youtu.be/vQv2hwE9DzQ

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2WAKFvQ
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The Dissenter
#90 Jason Manning: Sociology of Suicide and Terrorism

Dr. Jason Manning is an Associate Professor of Sociology at West Virginia University. He’s a theoretical sociologist who seeks to develop general explanations of human behavior, his work focuses primarily on conflict and social control, including various means of expressing grievances, handling disputes, and punishing offenses. Within this area he specializes in violent conflict, particularly in self-destructive forms of violence such as protest suicide, homicide-suicide, and suicide terrorism. His other interests include the sociology of science, sociology of religion, and neoDarwinian theories of culture. 

In this episode, I talk with Dr. Manning about suicide, from a sociological perspective. More specifically we talk about what is suicide, and why people commit it; suicide as a form of social control; suicide-homicide; and suicide as a political weapon.

https://youtu.be/qJZW76s3Ixw

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2XtPMKR
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The Dissenter
Gad Saad Part 2: The Enemies of Truth, Reason and Science

This is Part 2 of the conversation with Dr. Gad Saad: The Enemies of Truth, Reason and Science.

https://youtu.be/zvAATYX9sfg

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2IwVSnE
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The Dissenter
Parental Investment, Reciprocal Altruism, Self-Deception w/ Robert Trivers

Hi, everybody! To end the week, I bring you an interview with Dr. Robert Trivers. He is an American evolutionary biologist and sociobiologist. He proposed the theories of reciprocal altruism (1971), parental investment (1972), facultative sex ratio determination (1973), and parent–offspring conflict (1974). He has also contributed by explaining self-deception as an adaptive evolutionary strategy (first described in 1976) and discussing intragenomic conflict. Steven Pinker considers Dr. Trivers to be "one of the great thinkers in the history of Western thought". He’s also the author of books like Social Evolution (1985), Genes in Conflict: The Biology of Selfish Genetic Elements (2006), Deceit and Self-Deception: Fooling Yourself the Better to Fool Others (2011), and Wild Life: Adventures of an Evolutionary Biologist (2015).

In this episode, we talk about all of the major contributions of Dr. Trivers’ to the field of Evolutionary Biology. First, we look through the some of the major advancements in Evolutionary Biology since Darwin, particularly kin selection, inclusive fitness theory, and sexual selection. Dr. Trivers tells us about how we arrived at his theories of parental investment, reciprocal altruism and parent-offspring conflict. We explore parental investment in its several dimensions and implications. Then, we discuss parent-offspring conflict and the many ways it can manifest across species. We also refer to reciprocal altruism and the situations where friends can be more aligned with our interests than our own family. After that, we talk about deceit and self-deception, how they work, and some of the domains where they might have the biggest impact. We briefly discuss the modularity of mind approach. Finally, Dr. Trivers comments on group selection, and I also ask him to tell us about his more recent work on the evolutionary bases of honor killings in humans societies.

https://youtu.be/GE6KlSaBuqw

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2I3R3TO
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The Dissenter
Gad Saad Part 1: The Evolution of Consumer Behavior

This is Part 1 of the conversation with Dr. Gad Saad: The Evolution of Consumer Behavior.

https://youtu.be/HiiiWLyT8Ts

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2MyaxnN
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The Dissenter
Cooperation And Altruism In Apes And Children w/ Felix Warneken

Hi, everybody! Today, I bring you an interview with Dr. Felix Warneken. He is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Michigan. He’s interested in Developmental Psychology; Culture; Cognition; and Comparative Animal Behavior. His research group addresses questions like how and why human social life involves complex interactions between individuals working together, and what cognitive skills allow them to do so. They do so by examining the earliest forms of cooperation in young children, untangling the processes shaping cooperation across development in different sociocultural contexts, and comparing human cooperation with that of our closest evolutionary relatives, the great Apes.

In this episode, we talk about cooperation in the great Apes and human infants. First, we discuss the proper ways of talking about seemingly disparate behaviors, like cooperation, helping, and altruism. Then, we refer to how crucial it is for us to know how social cognition works in different species. We also address the problem of establishing a biological basis for behavior, and how to deal with sociocultural and behaviorist explanations, without disregarding environmental influences. We then talk about kin selection, reciprocal altruism, in-group favoritism, deception, and other mechanisms that operate in both humans and other close primates. Toward the end, we talk about what distinguishes humans from other primates at the level of social cognition.

https://youtu.be/JO_vKNHodVE

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2WjHh3q
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The Dissenter
#89 Gad Saad: The Evolution of Consumer Behavior, and the Enemies of Science

Dr. Gad Saad is Professor of Marketing at Concordia University, holder of the Research Chair in Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences and Darwinian Consumption. He’s the founder of the field of Darwinian Consumption. He was an Associate Editor of Evolutionary Psychology (2012-2015) and of Customer Needs and Solutions (2014- ). He’s been the recipient of several awards, and he’s also a prolific writer, a popular blogger for Psychology Today, and the author of three books, including The Evolutionary Bases of Consumption.

In this episode, we start off by talking about some of the main subjects covered by Dr. Saad’s work. First, I ask him to tell us why he decided to apply evolutionary theory to consumer behavior. We then move on to talk about cultural artifacts as fossils of the human mind, the four great cognitive pillars of consumer behavior, and why some people have addictive behaviors. After I ask him if he has sold his soul to the capitalist devil, we talk about the many ways intellectual terrorists try to butcher evolutionary psychology, the entire field of Psychology, and even science itself as an intellectual enterprise. 

https://youtu.be/2MBSayBwJyk

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2JYPfgP
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The Dissenter
#88 David Buss: Evolutionary Psychology, and the Basics of Human Mating

Dr. David Buss is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. He’s one of the founders of the field of evolutionary psychology. His primary research focus is on strategies of human mating. He’s the author of many books, including The Evolution of Desire, and the first textbook in Evolutionary Psychology, Evolutionary Psychology: The New Science of the Mind.

In this episode, we start off by talking a bit about Dr. Buss’ background, and what led him to Evolutionary Psychology. Then, we get into his research on human mating, from the conceptual foundations to universal sex differences in mate preferences, and mate retention tactics. We also discuss how modern technology might be tweaking our brains into preferring short-term mating strategies, namely with things like dating websites and online pornography. And we finish with some current work he’s doing on sexual morality, and if all of this knowledge can help couples with their intimate relationships.

https://youtu.be/BgmE8wHLol8

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://tinyurl.com/yyxfegk7
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The Dissenter
#87 Helen Steward: Philosophy of Action, Free Will, Moral Responsibility

Dr. Helen Steward is a Professor of Philosophy of Mind and Action at the University of Leeds, in the UK. Her research focusses on Philosophy of Action, Free Will, Philosophy of Mind and Metaphysics. In February 2015 she was awarded a Research Leadership Fellowship by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. She’s an associate editor for the journal Philosophical Explorations. And she’s also the author of the books The Ontology of Mind, and A Metaphysics for Freedom. 
In this episode, we talk about Philosophy of Action. What is the importance of understanding action and what causes action in studying agency and free will; action as downward causation; how to deal with other animals at a moral level; and the relationship between free will, determinism, moral responsibility, and social stability. 

https://youtu.be/WggFO-sUwOI

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2K0eWOj
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The Dissenter
The Anthropology Of Romantic Love, Attraction, And Attachment w/ Helen Fisher

Hi, everybody! This Monday, I have an interview with Dr. Helen Fisher for you. She is a biological anthropologist, and a Senior Research Fellow at The Kinsey Institute, Indiana University. She has written six books on the evolution, biology, and psychology of human sexuality, monogamy, adultery and divorce, gender differences in the brain, the neural chemistry of romantic love and attachment, human biologically-based personality styles, why we fall in love with one person rather than another, hooking up, friends with benefits, living together and other current trends, and the future of relationships-- what she calls: slow love. She’s the author of books like Why We Love: The Nature and Chemistry of Romantic Love, Why Him? Why Her?: How to Find and Keep Lasting Love, and Anatomy of Love: A Natural History of Mating, Marriage, and Why We Stray.

In this episode, we focus on romantic love. We start off by talking about its evolutionary and neurobiological bases. We also refer to sex differences and the extent to which they apply to romantic love. We go through the main symptoms of love that occur cross-culturally, as well as the hormones and neurotransmitters associated with it. Then, we discuss the several factors that go into who people fall in love with, including personality types. We also talk about the pattern of 3-4 years of romantic relationships in humans, and what’s being it, and if we can really talk about a preferred mating system in humans. We focus on the problems associated with polyamory relationships, and also on slow love as a possible preferred approach to relationships in the future.

https://youtu.be/FyZJz_-Ndj4

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2WhUezM
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The Dissenter
#86 Colin McGinn: Types of Minds, Consciousness, Animal Rights

Dr. Colin McGinn has taught philosophy at institutions of higher learning including University College London, Rutgers University, and Oxford University. He’s the author of over two dozen books including The Character of Mind, Consciousness and Its Objects, and The Making of a Philosopher, and he has also written for the London Review of Books, The New Republic, Wall Street Journal, The New York Review of Books, and other publications. 

In this episode, I talk with Dr. McGinn about minds and consciousness. More specifically, about what is a mind; the different types of minds; how to avoid dualism; if the phenomenology of consciousness can be scientifically explained; the continuity of mental capacities between animals; a couple of science fiction proposals, like creating conscious machines, and mind uploading; and animal rights.

https://youtu.be/G02tTbeY964

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2XgTG9X
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The Dissenter
Sex, Power, And Partisanship w/ Hector Garcia

Hi, everybody! This Friday, I am releasing an interview with Dr. Hector A. Garcia. He is a clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). He’s Assistant Professor at the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He has published extensively on the treatment of PTSD in combat veterans, masculine psychology in the aftermath of war, the evolutionary roots of political partisanship, and the interplay between religious practice and psychopathology. He’s also the author of Alpha God: The Psychology of Religious Violence and Oppression, and Sex, Power, and Partisanship: How Evolutionary Science Makes Sense of Our Political Divide.

In this episode, we focus our conversation on Dr. Garcia’s latest book, “Sex, Power, and Partisanship”. We talk about how the liberal and conservative political tribes evolved from the standard masculine and feminine psychologies. We discuss how traits that might have served an evolutionary function in the past are not necessarily good for us in our modern environments, the phenomenon of instinct blindness, and the naturalistic fallacy. We refer to the fact that most human societies have been patriarchal and how the systems of rule and law favored men, and allowed for them to control women’s behavior, with focus on their sexual behavior. Finally, we talk about our current polarized political environment, and how we can apply this knowledge to counter it, and also what could be the best ways to deal with gender equality in politics.

https://youtu.be/56X7BO1AZk0

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2KgDgL6
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The Dissenter
#85 Debra Lieberman: Disgust, Morality, and the Law

Dr. Debra Lieberman is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the College of Arts and Sciences of the University of Miami, US. She recently published a book, Objection: Disgust, Morality, and the Law.

In this episode, we talk about some of the topics of the book Objection: Disgust, Morality, and the Law. We first discuss what are emotions. Then, we move on to disgust specifically, and what domains it gets applied to. We also talk a bit about kin recognition and incest avoidance. And we finish with how moral norms derived from disgust might have been crystallized in the form of laws.

https://youtu.be/F7KCXBPvRlg

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2WybgJd
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The Dissenter
Astrobiology, And What Is Life w/ Charles Lineweaver

Hi, everybody! Today, I am releasing an interview with Dr. Charles H. Lineweaver. He is the convener of the Australian National University's Planetary Science Institute and holds a joint appointment as an associate professor in the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Research School of Earth Sciences. He was a member of the COBE satellite team that discovered the temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background. Before his appointment at ANU, he held post-doctoral positions at Strasbourg Observatory and the University of New South Wales where he taught one of the most popular general studies courses "Are We Alone?". His research areas include cosmology, exoplanetology, and astrobiology and evolutionary biology. 

In this episode, we talk about astrobiology. We go through some general topics, like complexity in the Universe; Darwinian and Lamarckian evolution; multilevel selection; looking for life on other planets, the extremophile life forms, and if we could find life that is not carbon-based, and related issues. In the end, we also discuss the scientific relevance of discovering life elsewhere, and also the new perspective it would bring to humanity.

https://youtu.be/1CVjgIr6gBc

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2Kdo2pT
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The Dissenter
#84 Garett Jones: Hive Mind, The Importance of National IQ, and Immigration

Dr. Garett Jones is Associate Professor of Economics and BB&T Professor for the Study of Capitalism at the Mercatus Center, at George Mason University. His research interests include macroeconomics, monetary economics, and the microfoundations of economic growth. His work has appeared in journals such as the Journal of Monetary Economics, the Journal of Economic Growth, and Critical Review. His first book, published in 2015 by Stanford University Press, is entitled Hive Mind: How Your Nation's IQ Matters So Much More Than Your Own.

In this episode, we focus on Dr. Jones’ book, Hive Mind. Topics include: the individual and collective benefits of higher national IQs; how IQ correlates with emotional and social skills; its effects in the political realm; how it relates to current immigration issues; and possible solutions to improve IQ in the countries that lack it the most. 

https://youtu.be/xPzaneVj7Oo

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://tinyurl.com/y5554rvs
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The Dissenter
#83 Richard Wilkinson: The Spirit Level, How to Seek Equality

Dr. Richard Wilkinson is Professor Emeritus of Social Epidemiology at the University of Nottingham, having retired in 2008. He is also Honorary Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health at University College London and Visiting Professor at the University of York. In 2009, he co-founded The Equality Trust. He was also awarded a 2013 Silver Rose Award from Solidar for championing equality and the 2014 Charles Cully Memorial Medal by the Irish Cancer Society. Finally, he’s the co-author of the greatly influential book, along with his wife, Dr. Kate Pickett, The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better.

In this episode, we focus on Dr. Wilkinson’s book, The Spirit Level, and discuss some of the main topics about economic inequality. Topics include: how to define economic inequality; the social and individual benefits of equality; Martin Daly’s work and sexual inequality; the case of Scandinavian countries; possible ways to fight inequality and its effects; and Universal Basic Income. 

https://youtu.be/YdvyAiR92oo

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2VRAuxP
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The Dissenter
#82 Maurício Martins: Cérebro, Mente, Comportamento e Livre Arbítrio

O Dr. Maurício Martins encontra-se neste momento a fazer um pós-doutoramento na Berlin School of Mind and Brain, da Humboldt Universtät zu Berlin, e também do Instituto Max Plack para as Ciências Cognitivas Humanas e do Cérebro. É doutorado em Neurociência, pela Faculdade de Medicina de Lisboa.

Neste episódio, falamos sobre dualismo, ou a dicotomia cérebro-mente; questões sobre causalidade e correlação entre atividade cerebral e comportamento; e sobre como se deve abordar o problema do livre arbítrio.

https://youtu.be/CP3b5INr00A

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/2HEBh1q
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The Dissenter
Evolution, Child Development, And Modern Environments w/ David Bjorklund

Hi, everybody! Today, I have an interview with Dr. David Bjorklund for you. He is a Professor of Psychology at Florida Atlantic University where he teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in developmental and evolutionary psychology. He served as Associate Editor of Child Development (1997-2001) and is currently serving as Editor of the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. His books include The Origins of Human Nature: Evolutionary Developmental Psychology (with Anthony Pellegrini), Origins of the Social Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and Child Development (edited with Bruce Ellis), Why Youth is Not Wasted on the Young: Immaturity in Human Development, Child and Adolescent Development: An Integrative Approach (with Carlos Hernández Blasi), and Children's Thinking: Cognitive Development and Individual Differences, now in its fifth edition. His current research interests include children's cognitive development and evolutionary developmental psychology.

In this episode, we talk about evolutionary developmental psychology. We discuss the role that development plays in biology; the importance of the field of evolutionary psychology; the current state of the art of human epigenetics; behavioral genetics and the nature-nurture debate; what is “innate” in human psychology; behavioral plasticity; our long period of development as a species and what we acquire through it; some species-typical mental abilities, like imitation, theory of mind and culture; the importance of play; and implicit knowledge. We wrap up the interview by talking about evolutionary mismatch and how we are not adapted to certain aspects of our modern environment, and the problems that might bring; and also how we can apply this knowledge to develop better education systems. 

https://youtu.be/MoLk2KRCKu8

Link to podcast version (Anchor): https://bit.ly/30IYsis

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At this level I think you should have serious influence over the direction of my channel. You'll be invited to a Skype call every three months (Max. 10 people) where we can discuss anything you lot desire, and where you can voice a tremendous amount influence on my channel: Access to my exclusive feed. The chance to send me questions to pose to each guest. The ability to suggest people you would like to see on the show. I will include your name on the final credits of each video, as a Producer.

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$50
per month
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Executive Producer

You’re the absolute best! If you pledge such a huge amount to my channel, then I will have to present you with such goodies: Access to my exclusive feed. The chance to send me questions to pose to each guest. The ability to suggest people you would like to see on the show. I will include your name on the final credits of each video, as an Executive Producer. A 30-minute Google Hangouts or Skype session with me, per month.

Unlock

Features

  • You’re the best! I can’t thank you enough! You’re now a supporter of The Dissenter, and along with my eternal gratitude you’ll receive: Access to my exclusive feed, where you’ll be the first to know what guests I will be interviewing. The chance to send me questions to pose to each guest.
The subscription gives you:
  • Full, unlimited access to Star's profile content - to view it online or to download it to future use.
  • Support your Star by donating – one-time or recurring.
  • You can cancel this subscription at any time.
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